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Why Everyday Water Cuts Matter

admin / March 16, 2021

Water doesn’t really seem to be a problem. Even in restricted drought-stricken states, residents can turn on the tap to find running water at any time. Water bills also remain stable. With direct access to water on demand, we all take it for granted. It is the basic need of every person that is always satisfied. So why do you keep hearing about water scarcity? It’s all just inflated for the hype, so does the media have anything to cover? In other words, you may be wondering if it’s really a problem. After all, you can’t see the problem with your eyes; however, countless organizations warn and report on the importance of water conservation efforts.

Here are some facts:

America’s water infrastructure (the pipes and other equipment that holds water in every building) is dying of old age. It was built with technology and investments that are over 50 and 100 years old. These systems leak and are prone to failure.

The more water we use, the more electricity is needed to move that water and treat it. If we use a significant amount less, the electricity will go down.

The amount of fresh water available that we are able to use in our daily life is only 0.0008% of all water on Earth. The rest of that water is unusable because it is trapped in soil moisture and frozen in ice.

Climate change is bringing unreliable rainfall to the country: too much in some places, too little in others, and not in the times we are used to and we count on it to arrive.

The number of people in this country and the volume of water they use is disproportionate to the amount of water available in this country. In other words, our population is straining our water resources and we could be at risk of being depleted if we continue the same habits and growth rates.
Therefore, organizations currently push for every household to conserve water, using less and using what they do in smarter ways to reduce waste. This way we can save on the costs of collecting the water, cleaning it and then pumping it where it is needed. Plus, should your area of ​​the country find itself in severe drought, the impacts may not be as devastating if all of its residents were already aware of the water. Those cost savings will be seen by every consumer and states, who can then direct some of those savings towards correcting our infrastructure problem. Solving these problems will also drastically reduce the amount of water wasted, freeing it for our use.

There is a saying: you can’t do everything, but you can do something. Here are some quick and easy tips for conserving water in your home: Waterlooexterminators.ca

Take a shower instead of a bath and shorten the length.

Wash only when necessary, instead of every single time.

Use low-flow shower heads and shower nozzles.

Wash the dishes in the dishwasher instead of by hand and only run the dishwasher when it is full.

If you don’t have a dishwasher, fill one side of the sink with clean water for rinsing, instead of letting the water run as you scrub.

Collect the rinse water and use it to water your house plants (residual surfactants and food residues will not harm your plants).

Fill your pet’s bowls with the room temperature water that you have forgotten and that you will not drink on your own. It won’t hurt them (or you) to drink it.

Turn off the tap while brushing your teeth.

Open the tap only when you use the water, and when you do, leave the flow as low as you need, rather than at full blast. The faster the flow, the more water is used.

Reuse disposable water bottles or buy BPA-free refillable bottles to drink from, instead of buying bottled water over and over. Bottled water is great for emergencies, but you can refill and store refillable bottles just as easily.

Turn off the ice maker when the ice cube tray is full to reduce wasted ice that is found and develops freeze burn.

Don’t water your lawn unless you absolutely need it. Check the weather report to see if rain is forecast for the next two days. Check the grass: if the blades pop out after being flattened, it doesn’t need water. Collect rainwater in a few buckets when it rains and use it in the garden on the driest days.