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How City Architecture and Urban Sprawling Affect the Both Domestic Canines and Wild Animals

admin / March 16, 2021

Looking at today’s homes in the United States and other developed countries alike we can see two growing trends that mark the main residential situations in the country. These do not include isolated residential areas or areas with short-term tenants such as farms, ranches, and RV parks. Most Americans live in a city or dense urban environment or in expanded outer cities that contain a network of suburban neighborhoods. I will study the pros and cons of these two types and their impact on humans, wild and domestic animals, and the environment. The term “deforestation” generally refers to the removal of a forest or trees in order to obtain access land which is then converted for non-forest use. This term often goes hand in hand with the terms “urban / suburban expansion, urbanization and suburbanization” which generally describe the continued expansion of human populations from central areas (cities) to sprawling, vehicle-dependent or suburban cities. These suburban towns are most noticeable when you fly over any part of Southern California, and developers create more of these cookie cutter houses every year. Why? There is a strong demand for large homes because our society teaches us that our assets are what measure our wealth and value. The perpetuation of a purely capitalist mentality is what allows for the continuation of development. It is because of this deforestation and uncontrolled urban sprawl that untamed animals are forced to leave their natural habitat and stumble across residential areas and streets in search of food, shelter and water. Bramptonwildlife.ca

\There is, however, another side to this coin. Mainly due to greed and unfounded fear, apartments in the most congested areas of the city are extremely expensive and often have animal restrictions. This would mean that those living in this area would be less likely to have many pets. This also means that those who already have pets (especially dogs) are less likely to move to the city center. These cookie-cutter homes provide some features that residential buildings in the city don’t quite measure up to. These features include greater privacy, a greater sense of security, and of course more space for families and pets. Most of those living in the suburbs are members of a larger family and are much more likely to have larger pets, i.e. larger dog breeds. The human mortality rate has decreased significantly since the introduction to modern medicine, which means there are more people at home. Architects are faced with the problem of developing solutions to humane, ethically and sensibly house this growing population in a sanitary residential home that will not add to the growing problem of deforestation and global warming. due to the number of variables involved. Just as there is no clear variable, there is no clear solution either. I will address the subject by investigating the work of urban designers, probing individuals and pet owners, and defining several fundamental problems. Physical issues, cultural issues, legal issues and economic issues. Finally, I will briefly explore several possible solutions that I have discussed with several licensed architects.